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Colony Occupancy: a case of conditions

STEVE REID
Editor & Publisher
sreid@lbknews.com

After Blake Fleetwood and Ruth Kriendler were granted permits from the Town of Longboat Key last week to repair their Colony Beach and Tennis Resort units, questions were raised by commissioners.

Chiefly, the Longboat Key  Commissioners asked Town Manager Dave Bullock what the process and procedure is for any re-occupancy of the resort, which has been closed since August 2010 and embroiled in courtroom battles between owners, interested parties and at times, the Town itself.

Bullock answered in a short letter with a 160-pages of attachments. The attachments are various inspection and condition reports that have been issued by Town entities and agencies and engineers including the building and fire departments.

Bullock made it clear that in spite of Fleetwood’s stated goal of re-occupancy, “Additional detailed inspection and research would be necessary should a property owner submit a specific request to reoccupy a building.”

That being stated, Bullock and staff compiled a list of relevant documents that detail conditions that must be met. A few of the more salient documents and requirements include:

• A September 3, 2014 Spreadsheet that shows Colony Beach Utility Billing and

Backflow Penalties Due in the amount of $343,983.65

• Broken sewer lines throughout the property

• Building and structural code violations throughout the property

• Severe mold and mildew intrusion causing health and safety hazards

• Electrical systems brought to code

• Water intrusion causing structural deficiencies requiring system wide and building wide inspection and approval

• Fractured piers and foundations and access railing on many buildings

• Exposed and leaking plumbing waste lines under several buldings

• Sheathing and exterior wood compromised by water and living organisms that could compromise building’s ability to handle wind loads

• Dozens of fire code violations must be rectified

• Engineering reports indicating that windows and glass sliders and wood sheathing are in extreme state of disrepair and past useful life and that real concern for life safety exists on the site

• A Town Commissioned report states that the beach facing units are approaching damage that may exceed the threshold wherein repairs are allowable under FEMA code.

• Karin’s Engineering opined the units are not safe for habitation.

 

Bullock also added that the issue of zoning and grandfathering and those requirements would have to be addressed before any occupancy could be granted.

Fleetwood and Kreindler were granted permits by the Town of Longboat Key last week to make interior renovations and alterations, demo a trellis, repair and replace windows and electrical panels as well as undertake mortar work and the replacement of air conditioning units.

Fleetwood told Longboat Key News that several owners will follow and they will move to repair the sewer and water systems and make the units habitable once again at the resort that has been closed since August 2010.

In a letter to fellow Colony unit owners, Fleetwood explains his rationale:  “We have done this in accordance with our strong belief in an overall plan for the Colony which is viable, feasible and practical. Having people living at the Colony will make it safe for everyone. We have begun construction …and hope to have our units finished in short order, before the winter.”

After Blake Fleetwood and Ruth Kriendler were granted permits from the Town of Longboat Key last week to repair their Colony Beach and Tennis Resort units, questions were raised by commissioners.

Chiefly, the Longboat Key  Commissioners asked Town Manager Dave Bullock what the process and procedure is for any re-occupancy of the resort, which has been closed since August 2010 and embroiled in courtroom battles between owners, interested parties and at times, the Town itself.

Bullock answered in a short letter with a 160-pages of attachments. The attachments are various inspection and condition reports that have been issued by Town entities and agencies and engineers including the building and fire departments.

Bullock made it clear that in spite of Fleetwood’s stated goal of re-occupancy, “Additional detailed inspection and research would be necessary should a property owner submit a specific request to reoccupy a building.”

That being stated, Bullock and staff compiled a list of relevant documents that detail conditions that must be met. A few of the more salient documents and requirements include:

• A September 3, 2014 Spreadsheet that shows Colony Beach Utility Billing and

Backflow Penalties Due in the amount of $343,983.65

• Broken sewer lines throughout the property

• Building and structural code violations throughout the property

• Severe mold and mildew intrusion causing health and safety hazards

• Electrical systems brought to code

• Water intrusion causing structural deficiencies requiring system wide and building wide inspection and approval

• Fractured piers and foundations and access railing on many buildings

• Exposed and leaking plumbing waste lines under several buldings

• Sheathing and exterior wood compromised by water and living organisms that could compromise building’s ability to handle wind loads

• Dozens of fire code violations must be rectified

• Engineering reports indicating that windows and glass sliders and wood sheathing are in extreme state of disrepair and past useful life and that real concern for life safety exists on the site

• A Town Commissioned report states that the beach facing units are approaching damage that may exceed the threshold wherein repairs are allowable under FEMA code.

• Karin’s Engineering opined the units are not safe for habitation.

 

Bullock also added that the issue of zoning and grandfathering and those requirements would have to be addressed before any occupancy could be granted.

Fleetwood and Kreindler were granted permits by the Town of Longboat Key last week to make interior renovations and alterations, demo a trellis, repair and replace windows and electrical panels as well as undertake mortar work and the replacement of air conditioning units.

Fleetwood told Longboat Key News that several owners will follow and they will move to repair the sewer and water systems and make the units habitable once again at the resort that has been closed since August 2010.

In a letter to fellow Colony unit owners, Fleetwood explains his rationale:  “We have done this in accordance with our strong belief in an overall plan for the Colony which is viable, feasible and practical. Having people living at the Colony will make it safe for everyone. We have begun construction …and hope to have our units finished in short order, before the winter.”

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